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Jul 112018
 

Working to overcome effects of significant childhood trauma leads to better lives for youngsters and their families but requires “a lot of human capital,” according to Achieve Columbia executive director Robert Lominack, Capital Rotary’s July 11 guest speaker.  Lominack (shown with Rotarian Ione Cockrell) co-founded the non-profit program in 2012 after working as a defense lawyer and high school teacher.  Currently embedded at Hand Middle School, Achieve Columbia builds long-lasting and deep relationships with at-risk students and families beginning in 7th grade and continuing through high school graduation.  Lominack said mitigating trauma’s negative impact “gives our students a wider window into the world and helps them find their place in it.”  With a combination of group and individualized mentoring, tutoring, resource coordination and counseling, Achieve Columbia successfully deals with issues including student behavior and academics, homelessness, transportation and life beyond high school.  Lominack is a Greenville, SC native and was educated at the University of the South in Tennessee and at Northeastern Law School in Boston.

July 11 2018 GUEST SPEAKER

 

 

 

 

 

Jun 202018
 

Columbia’s Capital Rotary has recognized 13 new Paul Harris Benefactors for making substantial contributions to the Rotary Foundation’s international humanitarian and educational programs.  Benefactors pledge to make a $1,000 Foundation donation through their wills or estate plans.  Those honored at the club’s June 20 assembly include (from left in Photo 1) Mike Montgomery, Felicia Maloney, Lee Ann Rice, Ben Carlton, Andy Markl, EJ Newby, Austin McVay, Allyson Way Hank, Perry Lancaster, Betsy Best, Abby Naas, Paul Gillam; (not pictured) Carol Caulk and Daniel Winders.  The club also recognized those named Paul Harris Fellows, signifying a $1,000 contribution to the Rotary Foundation.  They receive a special pin, a certificate and a medal to honor their donation.  The group included (from left in Photo 2) Walker Williams; Neda Beal – Paul Harris Fellow+4 (initial $1,000 gift plus four others of $1,000 each); EJ Newby – Paul Harris Fellow+1 (initial $1,000 gift plus another of $1,000); Austin McVay and Felicia Maloney; Frank Rutkowski – Paul Harris Fellow+1; Betsy Best; Stephen West – Paul Harris Fellow+1; and Alex Serkes (not pictured).

Benefactors 1 Paul Harris Fellows 1

Jun 062018
 

Capital Rotary held a club social event June 6 at the new Hunter-Gatherer brew pub located in Columbia’s historic Curtiss-Wright Hangar at Jim Hamilton-L.B. Owens Airport.  The steel and glass hangar was built in 1929 by the Curtiss-Wright Co., one of 30 or so located across the country.  It was dedicated as Columbia Municipal Airport in 1930.  In its brew pub configuration, the 13,000-square-foot hangar houses a 527-gallon brew house, a bottling and kegging line, a 1,200-square-foot tap room and a 1,000-square-foot event space, plus a pizza kitchen.  An outdoor rooftop Observation Deck seats 40-plus, with views of the airport and, through windows, down into the brewery.  Rotarians and guests enjoying an evening of fellowship included: (Photo 1 from left) Bill Beers, Daniel Winders and John Guignard; (Photo 2 from left) Philip Flynn, Ann Elliott and Jay von Kolnitz; (Photo 3 from left) Darren Foy, Sue Phelps, Tommy Phelps and Matthew Pollard; (Photo 4 from left) Chris Ray and Tommy Gibbons.  Artwork depicting the hanger in its heyday is shown in Photo 5, while Photo 6 is an outside view of the building today.  A highway marker detailing the hangar’s history (Photo 7) is located on the adjacent road.

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May 022018
 

Columbia’s Museum of Art will be an interactive place for visitors to “experience art” when current renovations are completed this year, said executive director Della Watkins, pictured with Rotarians Trey Boone (center) and Bob Davis as she spoke to Capital club members May 2.  Watkins came to Columbia after stints at art museums in Roanoke and Richmond, VA.  She said the museum updates here include (1) accredited storage space that’s climate controlled within a 5-degree range; (2) addition of four gallery spaces; (3) an events room that can accommodate 350-700 people; (4) a thematic approach to spark conversations, focus on shared experiences and allow interactive appreciation of art on display; (5) improvements making Boyd Plaza into a downtown green space; and (6) a new entrance on Main Street.  Watkins earned her BA from James Madison University and MAE from Virginia Commonwealth University.  She’s a graduate of leadership programs at Georgetown University, the University of Virginia and Getty Leadership Institute in Los Angeles.

CMA guest speaker

Apr 082018
 

An “understanding gap” affects the problem of homelessness among people 17-24 years of age in the Midlands, according to Stacey Atkinson and Jacquan Riley, guest speakers at Capital Rotary’s April 4 meeting.  The pair (shown in photo with Rotarians Perry Lancaster at left and Tony Thompson at right) said there were 130 homeless youth in the area last year.  Atkinson, a retired juvenile justice official, said the situation is a housing, economic and education issue but more public awareness could create a “community of care” to seek solutions.  “We need leaders willing to serve as mentors and life coaches for these young people,” Atkinson said.  “We need leaders who can offer opportunities for these young people to show what they have to offer.”  She also noted there’s a need for scholarships to help youth enroll in technical college trades and certificate programs leading to quick, stable employment.  Atkinson is graduate of Leadership South Carolina and has been a licensed SC Master Level Social Worker since 1989.

April 4 2018 Guest Speakers

Feb 152018
 

As Congaree Riverkeeper for the last six years, Bill Stangler works in the Midlands to protect the environmental quality of three different rivers and their tributaries because “water is a common good,” as he explained at Capital Rotary’s Feb. 14 meeting.  Stangler (pictured with Rotarian Ann Elliott) is a former outdoors guide who studied ecology and river science at the University of South Carolina.  He now monitors water, wildlife habitat and recreation conditions on the Congaree, Lower Saluda and Lower Broad Rivers – including 90 miles of river, 2,000 miles of streams and five different counties in the watershed.  Stangler said preserving “our rights to our rivers” involves (1) outreach and education about issues facing rivers; (2) advocacy work and voluntary cleanups, plus water quality sampling; and (3) suing to enforce environmental laws when regulatory agencies fail to do the job.  Congaree Riverkeeper is a non-profit organization, one of six in South Carolina affiliated with the Waterkeeper Alliance, a global movement of on-the-water advocates who patrol and protect rivers and coasts all over the world.  One of Rotary International’s areas of focus is support for local solutions to bring clean water, sanitation and hygiene to more people every day.

Bill Stangler - Ann Elliott photo

Jan 102018
 

The Boeing Company is proud to build the “airplane of the future” – its 787 Dreamliner – in South Carolina, and looks forward to continuing a rewarding partnership here for years to come.  Tommy Preston Jr., Director of National Strategy and Engagement and Government Operations at Boeing South Carolina, was Capital Rotary’s Jan. 10 guest speaker.  Preston is a native South Carolinian, a USC graduate, and formerly practiced law at Nexsen Pruet, LLC in Columbia.  He said Boeing’s aerospace campus in Charleston was made possible by commitment to workforce training, by the state’s non-union labor environment and by government flexibility in working together to solve any problems.  Boeing supports an estimated 9,000 direct and indirect Palmetto State jobs, works with 300 suppliers across the state, and invested about $2 billion in the Dreamliner final assembly and delivery facility.  The company also partners with local schools, the technical college system and the University of South Carolina to expand job opportunities and to advance aerospace products and services.  (Boeing Company photo)

Boeing in SC

Nov 302017
 

Since opening earlier this year, the University of South Carolina’s new School of Law has become the anchor for a “law corridor of Columbia” running along Gervais Street, says dean Rob Wilcox.  He told Capital Rotary members on a tour Nov. 29 (he’s at far right in photo) that the legal district also includes the S.C. Supreme Court, the State House and the National Advocacy Center, which trains attorneys from the U.S. Justice Department.  The three-story, $80 million law school features 17 classrooms and two realistic courtrooms.  Wilcox said its design has a purpose and an impact that goes beyond mere aesthetics.  “It’s designed to send a message to our students – it’s not just college anymore,” he explained.  “It’s the beginning of your profession.  Different things will be expected of students here.  There are responsibilities that come with this.”  USC’s School of Law is one of the nation’s oldest and the state’s only nonprofit law school.  Its new home occupies nearly an entire city block at Bull and Gervais streets.  Capital Rotary’s tour was part of the club’s Fifth Wednesday program featuring local field trips in place of a regular meeting.

law school courtoom - R

Oct 192017
 

Cybercrime costs U.S. business more than $1.3 billion yearly and often takes the form of bogus e-mails, according to Lt. D. Britt Dove, supervisory agent for the S.C. Law Enforcement Division’s (SLED) Computer Crime Center.  Dove (at right, talking with Rotarian Tommy Gibbons) was Capital Rotary’s Oct. 18 guest speaker.  He said every business connected to the internet is a potential cybercrime victim.  Businesses are vulnerable to being scammed by e-mail as criminals expand their ability to steal money directly or to turn stolen data into money.  Dove detailed several safeguards that include (1) educate employees to recognize suspicious e-mails; (2) be cautious when e-mails request confidential information or information out of the ordinary; (3)  double check e-mail sender details carefully, watching for similar domain names or characters that have been swapped for other letters; (4) forward e-mail responses instead of hitting “reply” so you can type out the genuine e-mail address for the person you wish to communicate with; and (5) confirm details of the e-mail request by contacting the sender using a known phone number.  Lt. Dove is a University of South Carolina graduate, a former West Columbia Police Dept. investigator, and is active in the Secret Service Electronic Taskforce, FBI Cyber Taskforce and the S.C. Attorney General’s Internet Crimes Against Children Taskforce.

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Sep 282017
 

The First Tee Columbia program uses golf to teach young people life lessons and leadership skills, according to executive director Sally Beacham (shown with Capital Rotary member Chris Ray).  Beacham, guest speaker at Rotary’s Sept. 27 meeting, said First Tee’s instruction helps youngsters 5-17 become good golfers and even better people by imparting core values such as respect, integrity, honesty, confidence, confidence and sportsmanship.  An affiliate of the World Golf Foundation, Columbia’s First Tee is part of the elementary physical education program in five Richland District One schools and plans to add Richland District Two schools in the future.  Beacham said First Tee participation has grown from 105 students to 335 over the last several years.  She joined the non-profit after playing collegiately  at St. Andrews Presbyterian College, where she was captain of the women’s golf team and a member of the all-conference team in 2008.

Reize - Kids Golf guest speaker

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