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Jan 092019
 

Since its beginning in 1854 Columbia’s YMCA has aimed to be a community servant in the Midlands, helping families and individuals “grow in mind, body and spirit,” says Bill Price, the organization’s CEO since 2016.  Price (shown at right in photo with Rotarian Jack Williamson) was Capital Rotary’s Jan. 9 guest speaker.  He said the Y now operates in six locations – downtown, Ballentine, Irmo, Lake Carolina, Red Bank and Orangeburg – and expects to break ground later this year for a new full-service facility in Kershaw County’s Lugoff-Elgin area.  YMCA programs range from swimming lessons to afterschool learning activities, from youth and adult sports to support for cancer survivors.  The Y’s mission – to put Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all – remains unchanged, Price said, along with its core values of caring, honesty, respect, responsibility and faith.  Price, a Wofford College graduate with a BA in government, was a longtime YMCA volunteer and board member before assuming the CEO’s post.

Guest speaker Bill Price

Nov 302018
 

The University of South Carolina collaborates with school districts to keep new teachers on the job – hoping to resolve a staffing crisis in public education.  So says Dr. Jon Pedersen, dean of USC’s College of Education and Capital Rotary’s Nov. 28 guest speaker.  Dr. Pedersen (at right in photo with Rotarian Trey Boone) touted the Carolina Teacher Induction Program, known as CarolinaTIP.  It’s a three-year “bridge of support” for recent graduates moving from college student to successful schoolteacher.  CarolinaTIP includes group workshops and experienced educators acting as the new teacher’s confidant, coach and mentor to promote “practical application of teaching theory in the classroom,” Dr. Pedersen said.  The goal is better student learning, increased teacher efficacy and teacher retention.  Dr. Pedersen said the rising tide of teachers quitting the profession causes not only staffing vacancies but also costs districts $23 million yearly for additional recruiting, hiring and training.  A 25% boost in retaining teachers would equal $11 million in savings.  CarolinaTIP’s outcomes are impressive: (1) 100% of participating teachers in 2017 came back to work for the 2018-19 school year; (2) they reported job stress went down and job satisfaction went up; and (3) 100% said the program had positive impact in their classrooms and on their decision to continue teaching.  Dr. Pederson said USC’s College of Education is the state’s largest teacher preparation school and CarolinaTIP, the only program of its kind, demonstrates the university’s commitment to graduates’ success.

Guest speaker Dr Pedersen 3

Oct 102018
 

Capital Rotarians heard the story of a unique boutique that helps cancer survivors feel whole again from the business founders – Sherry Norris (standing in photo) and Kim Neel (seated) – guest speakers at the club’s Oct. 10 meeting.  The pair opened Alala LLC in 2006 to serve women who’ve had all types of reproductive cancers.  The company specializes mainly in mastectomy prosthetics and bras, as well as compression pumps for cancer survivors.  Alala also offers compression garments and wig refurbishing, shampooing, conditioning, setting and styling.  In addition to their retail operation, Norris and Neel started a nonprofit organization in 2008 – the Alala Cancer Society – that helps provide women with donated mastectomy bras and wigs that would otherwise be unaffordable.  The enterprising pair met while working with the local Girl Scouts and remain active community and church volunteers.  Norris received business administration training at Georgia’s Kennesaw State University, while Neel earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Lenoir-Rhyne College in Hickory, NC.

Norris and Neel 2

Sep 132018
 

The Alzheimer’s Association-South Carolina Chapter’s vision for the future is a world without the dreaded disease of dementia.  Taylor Wilson (shown with Rotarian Tony Thompson), chapter director of communications and advocacy, was Capital Rotary’s guest speaker on Sept. 12.  She detailed the statewide group’s work to educate, support and advance critical research for treating, preventing and, ultimately, curing Alzheimer’s.  The chapter also promotes the needs and rights of patients and caregivers.  Wilson said 89,000 South Carolinians have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s; there are 309,000 caregivers in the state.  South Carolina’s death rate from Alzheimer’s is the nation’s highest and went up by 180% in the past year.  Wilson lauded Rotary for its support of CART – the Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust – a project started in 1996 to provide funds for cutting edge research to cure Alzheimer’s disease.  Wilson joined the Alzheimer’s Association staff three years ago and has spent the last 10 years working with non-profits around the Midlands area.  She is a 2007 graduate of the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business.

Taylor Wilson

Aug 152018
 

Blake Dubose (left in photo), immediate past president of Capital Rotary, receives a plaque from current president Philip Flynn in recognition of service to the Columbia-area club.  During DuBose’s 2017-18 tenure, Capital Rotary received a “Public Image Award” and a leadership citation from Rotary District 7770, among other honors.  Professionally, DuBose is president of DuBose Web Group, a website design and development firm founded in 2007.  He is a graduate of Newbery College.

Past president plaque

Aug 012018
 

The City of Columbia’s Office of Business Opportunities director has joined Capital Rotary.  Melissa L. Lindler (shown at center in photo with sponsor Gloria Saeed and club president Philip Flynn) took her city post after more than 20 years of experience in government and non-profit work.  Most recently she was district planning and outreach director for Congressmen Jim Clyburn.  Previously she was a staff member at the SC Department of Education and at South Carolina State University.  She received her BA in political science and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of South Carolina, and earned graduate certification in public management from Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis.  Lindler’s volunteer activities include board service for the International African American Museum, the Southeastern Institute for Women in Politics, the Columbia Chapter of the Society, Inc., Jack and Jill of America Foundation, Inc. and the Total Care for the Homeless Coalition.

melissa liindler photo

Jul 112018
 

Capital Rotary Club members recall the spirit of “Service Above Self” exemplified by former treasurer and 2017 Rotarian of the Year Craig Lemrow (shown in photo), who passed away Friday, July 6, 2018 at the age of 71.  A memorial observance was held July 14 at Saxe Gotha Presbyterian Church in Lexington.  Lemrow, a former member and past president of Lexington Rotary, joined the Capital club in 2014.  A U.S. Naval Academy graduate, he was a former military aviator and a retired Naval Reserve officer.  Most recently he worked as a senior business systems analyst in information technology for the Aflac Group in Columbia.  Lemrow had been recognized numerous times for multiple contributions to The Rotary Foundation, an international charitable fund that supports programs for world understanding and peace.

Craig Lemrow

Jun 132018
 

Paul Gillam (left in photo), a member of Capital Rotary’s scholarship selection committee, welcomes College of Charleston graduate Victoria Bailey to the June 13 weekly meeting.  Bailey, recipient of a four-year scholarship from the club, graduated from Dreher High in 2015 and majored in biology/molecular biology.  She plans to attend medical school and is eyeing a career as a surgeon, anesthesiologist or obstetrics/gynecology practitioner.  Capital Rotary has been supporting higher-education opportunities for local high school students for more than 20 years.  The club’s scholarships are based on a combination of academic performance, extracurricular activities and economic need.

Victoria Bailey

May 072018
 

Capital Rotarian Abby Naas was in costume and armed with a light saber for “Star Wars Night” at the Columbia Fireflies baseball game on Friday, May 4.  She was among a host of District 7770 club members enjoying a Rotary Night celebration, too, at Spirit Communications Park.  The evening of baseball, hot dogs and good sportsmanship combines fellowship and fund-raising, with additional proceeds going to the Rotary Foundation.  The hosting Fireflies are a minor league affiliate of the New York Mets.  Naas joined the Fireflies staff in January 2015 as marketing and public relations vice president.

May the Fourth be with you

Apr 112018
 

Capital Rotary is awarding scholarships to two college-bound Midlands students following 19 applicant interviews in late March.  Club members on the selection committee included (from left in photo) Paul Gillam, Allyson Way Hank and Darren Foy, plus Pete Pillow (not pictured).  A $20,000 scholarship – $5,000 annually for four years – is going to C.A. Johnson High School senior Amariyah Ayee, while Ben Lippen School senior Claire Davis is getting a $10,000 scholarship – $5,000 annually for two years.  Ayee, second-ranked in her class, plans to attend Claflin University and hopes to become a pediatric surgeon.  Davis will seek to major in engineering and plans to use that knowledge to solve clean water problems in third-world countries.  Capital Rotary has been supporting higher-education opportunities for local high school students for more than 20 years.  The club’s scholarships are based on a combination of academic performance, extracurricular activities and economic need.

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