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Dec 162020
 

Columbia’s Capital Rotary has recognized member Lee Ann Watson for making continuing contributions to the Rotary Foundation’s global humanitarian and educational programs.  She was named a Paul Harris Fellow Plus-One at the club’s Zoom meeting Dec. 16.  That signifies an initial gift of $1,000 plus another $1,000.  Paul Harris Fellow honors are named for the Chicago attorney who founded Rotary International in 1905.  Watson joined the Capital club in 2017 and currently serves as membership chair.  A Greenville native, she’s the S.C. Human Affairs Commission’s general counsel.  She is a graduate of Furman University and the University of South Carolina’s School of Law.  She formerly practiced law in Myrtle Beach, where she was a Chicora Rotary member.    

Agriculture A ‘Growing’ Business for State

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Aug 262020
 

Agriculture in South Carolina is big business – a $46.2 billion economic impact, 247,000 jobs and over 24,000 farms – but there’s still room to grow (no pun intended).  That’s what Capital Rotarians heard Aug. 26 from guest speaker Jack Shuler (in photo from SCNOW), director of agribusiness development for the Palmetto State.  Crops and poultry make up about 55% of farming’s impact, with 45% coming from forestry operations.  The equine industry, including areas around Camden, Aiken and near Tryon, NC, gives nearly a $2 billion per year boost.  Trade wars hurt farmers over the past two years, Shuler said, and the COVID 19 pandemic has disrupted supply chains, moved markets from an institutional base (restaurants/food processors) to consumer based (more cooking and eating at home), plus poses labor problems (especially among migrant workers).  Still, Shuler sees a promising future for South Carolina farming, forecasting billions more in economic impact by 2035.  Advances in technology and robotics (such as driverless tractors and harvesters) offer a labor solution, but require more technical skills and worker training in rural areas.  Controlled environments like greenhouses and aquaculture may reduce dependence on weather conditions.  Shuler said locating another poultry facility in the state is feasible and would be “a huge economic engine” for any rural county, bringing an additional 1,200 jobs.  “A lot of our fresh food now is trucked from California and Mexico,” Shuler said.  “We need to look at how we can bring those types of crops to be grown, marketed and processed in South Carolina.”  The state’s East Coast location – halfway between Virginia and Florida – makes it ideal for food preparation and shipping within a day.  Shuler retired in 2011 and joined the SC Agriculture Department staff after a 38-year career in farm credit operations.  A Clemson University graduate, he also has a Master’s Degree in Business and completed the Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State University.            

Caslen Briefs Rotarians on University Issues

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Jun 172020
 

University of South Carolina president Bob Caslen updated Capital Rotarians on a host of items June 17 at the downtown club’s biweekly Zoom meeting.  Topics ranged from possibly renaming iconic buildings to resuming fall classes on campus, and from football season prospects to strategic planning for the future. Caslen (in photo), a retired Army general who’s a graduate and former superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point, became USC’s 29th president last Aug. 1.  He told Rotarians that: (1) renaming Sims Hall on campus – a building named for a man who performed medical experiments on slaves – has been reviewed by a special committee, but the state’s Heritage Act requires a two-thirds vote in the General Assembly for such changes; (2) resuming onsite classes is based on mitigating health risks through COVID-19 testing, contact tracing, social distancing, wearing masks in class and “responsible measures” to avoid disease spread to the community at large; (3) the slate of Southeastern Conference football games likely will be played, but non-conference games may be decided on an individual team basis, and social distancing will impact stadium seating; and (4) USC’s strategic vision is to become the nation’s premier flagship university, serving the needs and transforming the lives of the people of South Carolina.  Caslen said he and his executive team will work to recruit the best students, employ world-class faculty and staff, boost the school’s research status, improve systemwide integration of programs and campus infrastructure, and prioritize economic development.

Foundation Brings ‘Hope’ to Liberia

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May 062020
 

Giving youngsters a safe place to learn, eat and grow is the mission of Hope Foundation Liberia, according to Columbia attorney Mark Arden, a board member for the non-profit and guest speaker at Capital Rotary’s first Zoom meeting on May 6 (shown in photo).  Arden detailed efforts to improve the lives of rural kindergarten students “physically, emotionally and mentally” in the poverty-stricken nation wracked by 14 years of civil war, followed by the Ebola epidemic.  Hope Foundation renovated buildings to serve as a temporary school and dug a new well to bring clean drinking water to the community.  A new school on seven acres of land is nearly finished.  It has enrolled 160 children and has a curriculum including etiquette, agriculture, being kind to others and trusting in God in addition to reading and writing.  Children are fed two meals daily and will learn how agriculture can promote sustainability for the school.  Arden is a partner at Chappell, Smith & Arden and graduated from the University of South Carolina and the university’s School of Law.

Guest speaker Powerpoint 400

Rotarians, USC Students Begin Mentorship

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Mar 032020
 

A reception (in photo) recently launched a new mentorship program being established by Columbia’s Rotary clubs and students in the University of South Carolina’s Rotaract Club.  The goal is helping Rotaractors find success in their fields of study, professional development and life after graduation.  Mentors and students will be matched based on profession and the student’s major and area of interest.  A student may have up to two mentors and will participate in activities such as career and course guidance, resume review, local industry networking events, and exploring internship opportunities.  USC Rotaract is open to young adults interested in community service, leadership and social activities.  Capital Rotary became the student group’s lead sponsor in July 2019.  The local Vista Night and Main Street Rotary clubs are co-sponsors.

Mentor meeting

Treasurer ‘Good Steward’ of Public Funds

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Feb 052020
 

State treasurer Curtis Loftis touched on the highlights of his role as South Carolina’s “private banker” when he addressed Capital Rotary members Feb. 5.  Loftis (shown in photo) is responsible for managing, investing and retaining custody of nearly $50 billion in public funds.  He said state government is “doing well” financially, but he remains vigilant to “see that we are good stewards of your money.”  For instance, Loftis praised the SC Department of Transportation for “doing more work at less cost than ever before.”  But he warned that some nonprofit entities tied to corporate (instead of local) interests are getting public funds for services that state agencies and employees could provide more economically.  He said some $450 million is awarded to nonprofits, but in some cases “we don’t know what good they do for how much.”  Loftis was first elected treasurer in 2010.  A 1981 graduate of the University of South Carolina, he is a member of the Cayce-West Columbia Rotary Club.  Loftis has held leadership positions in numerous state, regional and national fiscal authorities and associations.

Guest speaker Curtis Loftis 400

Jan 072020
 

The EarlyAct Club at St. Peter’s Catholic School in Columbia had an active holiday season and is planning projects in January and February, too.  For details, see this recent posting on the Rotary District 7770 website.   The club was established by Rotary clubs in the Columbia area earlier this school year.  EarlyAct is a service organization for elementary students ages 5 to 13.  It develops character and leadership skills closely linked to the ideals of Rotary International.

earlyact-logo

Elementary Students Aid Polio Fight

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Oct 282019
 

EarlyAct Club members at St. Peter’s Catholic School have presented a check for $112 to Bernie Riedel (red t-shirt in back row), past governor for Rotary District 7770 and current End Polio Now chair.  The youngsters held a Purple Pinkie Fundraiser (each donation gets one of your fingers painted purple) in support of Rotary International’s campaign to eradicate polio worldwide.  Their contribution will be matched two-fold by the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation – a campaign partner – so that an additional 3,000 children in third-world countries can receive polio vaccinations.  End Polio Now has helped immunize more than 2.5 billion children in 122 countries.  Columbia-area Rotarians sponsor St, Peter’s EarlyAct Club as a service organization for students ages 5 to 13.  It helps youth develop character and leadership skills linked to the ideals of Rotary International.

EarlyAct donation 600

EarlyAct Launched at St. Peter’s School

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Oct 032019
 

Rotary clubs in the Columbia area have launched an EarlyAct Club at St. Peter’s Roman Catholic School.  EarlyAct is a service organization for elementary students ages 5 to 13.  It   develops character and leadership skills closely linked to the ideals of Rotary International.  Capital Rotary member EJ Newby (left in photo) helped to distribute EarlyAct pins at St. Peter’s recent kickoff meeting.  Each EarlyActor also received a membership card explaining the Four-Way Test used by Rotarians worldwide as a moral code for the things we think, say or do in personal and business relationships.  Students will undertake various service projects during the school year and will be donating their spare change to support the CART (Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust) Fund.  This initiative began in South Carolina over 20 years ago and has since been adopted by Rotary clubs throughout the United States.  All of its donations go toward grants for research aimed at preventing or finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

EarlyactPinningCeremony

Technology Changes Real Estate Trade

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Aug 142019
 

Over the past 20 years, technology has spawned widespread changes in real estate buying, selling and closings, according to lawyer and broker Gary Pickren, guest speaker at Capital Rotary’s Aug. 14 meeting.  Pickren (in photo with Rotarian Gloria Saeed) detailed changing roles for agents and attorneys in today’s electronic-driven marketplace.  Agents – once seen as advisors, counselors and advocates for their clients – now chiefly provide emotional support and keep a transaction’s progress on schedule.  In the future, Pickren sees agent compensation moving to a sliding scale instead of percentage commissions, or becoming an ala carte system based on flat fees plus extra “menu options.”  He said real estate attorneys’ offices today function more professionally because of consumer protection laws, while lending a marketing and social experience touch for closing transactions.  Technology will continue making inroads, leading to more online documents and electronic closings.  In short, Pickren said, “it’s not your grandfather’s law firm anymore.”  Pickren grew up in Spartanburg and graduated from Wofford College.  Since 1995 he has performed real estate closings, taught agents and advocated for all South Carolinians in changing the state’s real estate laws.

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