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Jul 172019
 

Assistant District Governor Eric Davis explained how Rotary International’s 2019-2020 theme – “Rotary Connects the World” – will be put into action when he spoke to Capital Rotarians on July 17.  Davis (in photo with club president Abby Naas) said adapting to a new generation of potential members might include more flexible meeting schedules, more family-friendly activities, more networking opportunities and continued emphasis on service projects.  A local “Discovery Rotary Day” aims to increase community awareness and raise the organization’s profile, while an August summit offers training in membership growth.  Community service projects include a “Together We Read” literacy program for elementary students, plus fund-raising to benefit “Key Changes Therapy” for childhood behavior problems.  Local clubs are sponsoring an Interact Club at St. Peter’s Catholic School, developing leadership skills and service activities for young people.  Davis said District 7770 will continue to raise money for the CART (Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust) Fund supporting medical research grants and for World Polio Day – an international campaign to eradicate the crippling disease. District Rotarians also plan to pack 1 million meals for Rise Against Hunger, an international relief organization coordinating the packaging and distribution of food and other life-changing aid to people in developing nations.

Guest speaker Eric Davis

Jun 192019
 

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil – the non-intoxicating marijuana extract that’s become a hot new “medicinal product” – may have a role to play in maintaining good health and treating disease.  But University of South Carolina research vice president Dr. Prakash Nagarkatti also had some words of caution when he addressed Capital Rotary Club members June 19.  Dr. Nagarkatti (at left in photo with Rotarian Bud Foy) said CBD is useful for easing chronic inflammation that underlies “major clinical disorders” like cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases, PTSD, cancer, obesity and some aspects of aging.  His patent on the use of CBD to treat autoimmune hepatitis has been approved by the FDA.   But Dr. Nagrkatti warned that (1) CBD does not cure everything, (2) it can have adverse interactions with other medicines, (3) a doctor’s consultation is important before using CBD and (4) take care that CBD comes from a reliable source with a certificate of analysis.  He noted that CBD being marketed as a “health or nutrition supplement” is not subject to FDA regulation.  Dr. Nagrkatti has undergraduate and graduate degrees in botany, chemistry and microbiology and a doctorate in immunology.  He was named USC’s Vice President for Research in October 2011.

Guest speaker Dr Prakash Nagarkatti

Jun 052019
 

Capital Rotarians have given a helping hand to a local family and to a local charity as part of the club’s commitment to community service, according to president Philip Flynn.  The family assistance helped Tameika and Jerome Smith and their six children relocate after being displaced from Allen Benedict Court in January due to dangerous gas leaks.  The Smiths had to leave their possessions behind and were in temporary housing until moving into a new apartment in May.  Club members donated time, money and household items – including furniture, kitchenware, bedding and clothing – so the Smiths could get back on their feet and set up house again.  Flynn said Mrs. Smith (at new home’s door in photo) wanted to convey how much the family appreciates Capital Rotary’s support and contributions.  He told the club that Mrs. Smith said: “Everything you did is a blessing!”  Help for the local charity came as a result of the club’s touring Columbia’s Ronald McDonald House on May 29.  The facility needs new signage to better mark its location.  Capital Rotarians have raised over $1,000 toward a goal of $1,200 for this purchase.  Flynn said he’s confident the goal will be met.  “We know the Ronald McDonald House provides a tremendous resource for families needing lodging, food and fellowship while their children receive the healthcare they need,” Flynn added.

Tameika Smith

May 222019
 

Rapid adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) is changing society and culture around the world, according to technology consultant Eric Davis, Capital Rotary’s May 22 guest speaker.  Davis (shown with Rotarian Ione Cockrell) said merging AI, robotics and supercomputing leads to machines that are smarter, better and faster than humans.  Automation is keeping a lid on wages, with fewer high-salary jobs being created, most requiring very high education levels.  Wall Street’s volatility will increase as the labor structure changes.  Companies must respond to rapidly changing consumer income and habits.  Globally, various nations will adjust to digital economic change at different rates.  In smart offices, AI assistants will control a wide range of functions and devices, the same as in smart stores.  Personal robots will become commonplace at home. AI also is changing job recruitment via candidate screening, resume analysis and video interviews.  An Ohio native and Ohio State graduate, Davis has worked as a programmer, systems analyst, systems administrator and consultant in industries such as engineering, light manufacturing, local government and nuclear power.  He’s currently a professional services director for Respect Technology, Inc.

Guest speaker Eric Davis

May 012019
 

Capital Rotary member Melissa Lindler and club president Philip Flynn display a patch received for taking part in a World Polio Day Rally to End Polio Now.  The event was held at the SC State House last October to raise awareness about the continuing effort to end polio – a vaccine preventable disease that still threatens children in parts of the world.  Since Rotary and its partners launched the Global Polio Eradication Initiative 30 years ago, the incidence of polio has plummeted by more than 99.9 per cent.  Rotary has committed to raising $50 million a year in support of global eradication and has contributed more than $1.8 billion towards that end since 1985.

End Polio Patch

End Polio

Apr 172019
 

For safety’s sake, it’s important to know the signs of sex trafficking and for parents – especially – to ensure that children take charge of their own security.  That’s what investigator Chandra Cleveland-Jennings told the Capital Rotary Club at its April 17 breakfast meeting.  Cleveland-Jennings (shown in photo with Rotarian Frank Rutkowski) heads Columbia Private Investigations & Consultants.  She’s also an ambassador for Shared Hope International, helping to improve sex trafficking laws and to train community, business and law enforcement personnel on combatting this type of crime.  She noted that Richland and Lexington counties rank first and third, respectively, for sex trafficking in the state.  Victims are lured into commercial sexual exploitation by traffickers using force, fraud or coercion.  The trauma can be so great that many of those exploited don’t see themselves as victims or won’t ask for help.  Cleveland-Jennings began her law enforcement career at the Richland County Sheriff’s Department and was the first female to be named “Deputy of the Year” in South Carolina.  She’s a graduate of Benedict College and of the SC Criminal Justice Academy.

Guest speaker Chandra Cleveland-Jennings

Mar 202019
 

The Class of 2020’s Grace Cooney is the second University of South Carolina student asking Capital Rotary Club to endorse her application for a Global Grant Scholarship.  Cooney (shown in photo) is a Greenville native majoring in public health.  The award would enable her to pursue a Master’s of Science Degree in Migration, Culture and Global Health from Queen Mary University in London.  She says this would expand her understanding of health to address not only the physical ailment, but also religious affiliation, native culture and socioeconomic status affecting patients.  She hopes to become a physician practicing internationally, working with underserved and vulnerable populations abroad.  Cooney has been a Phi Delta Epsilon International Medical Fraternity officer, an anatomy lab teaching assistant and a volunteer at Carolina Survivor Clinic.  In a four-year summer internship in Greenville, she experienced hands-on training, interactive workshops and professional engagement seminars.  Recipient of a Stamps Carolina Scholarship – the university’s highest academic scholarship award – Cooney was one of three students granted enrichment funds for out-of-classroom experiences for excelling in leadership and service.  Rotary International’s Global Grant scholarships support graduate-level study in one of six areas of focus: peace, disease prevention, water and sanitation, maternal/child health, education and economic/community development.

Grace Cooney photo

Feb 202019
 

David Ballard works for the state’s Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office as a professional land surveyor examining county boundaries, but the passage of time can complicate that job.  Ballard (shown at left in photo with Rotarian Mike Montgomery) was Capital Rotary’s Feb. 20 guest speaker.  He explained how the South Carolina Geodetic Survey determines county lines even when many of the border landmarks of the past – like trees, roads and bridges – no longer exist or have been altered by history.  Researchers may use colonial records, old maps, plats, land transfers and deeds to help determine boundaries.  Fixing exact and proper borders can affect property taxes, fire departments, EMS and police services, schools, enforcement of property rights and election of public officials.  It can also involve time and expense, Ballard said, noting that it took 20 years for the states of North and South Carolina to research and agree on the 337-mile border between them.

Guest speaker David Ballard

Jan 302019
 

Capital Rotary members got a firsthand look Jan. 30 at Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation’s expanded facility in Lexington County.  The $125 million investment adds 36,000 square feet of manufacturing space to the company’s West Columbia campus located off 12 Street Extension near the Amazon distribution center.  Nephron is a leading maker of respiratory and other sterile medications for hospitals, retail pharmacies, mail order pharmacies, home care companies and long-term care facilities.  Nephron announced plans to move to the Midlands in 2011 and relocated its headquarters from Orlando, FL.  Capital Rotary first visited the campus in October 2014.  The club tours various points of interest throughout the community as part of its Fifth Wednesday program that substitutes field trips in place of a regular weekly breakfast meeting.

nephron 3 resized

Nephron group poto

Dec 192018
 

Capital Rotary Club adopted a local family and provided gifts for the holiday season (shown in photo) as part of the 2018 Midlands Families Helping Families Christmas program, a Palmetto Project and WIS-TV initiative.  Club members had the option of purchasing gifts or making a monetary donation.  The adopted family included two adults and five children.  One hundred percent of the club membership participated, according to Rotarian Catherine Mabry, who oversaw the project.  The family also received a $100 Food Lion gift card.  For 25 years, the Families Helping Families program has provided gifts, clothing, food and other essentials to thousands of Midlands neighbors in need, ensuring that all may share in the joy of the Christmas season.

Presents for Family

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