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Jun 262019
 

Capital Rotary president Philip Flynn recognizes at-large director and service chair Neda Beal for continuing Rotary Foundation donations that support world understanding and peace programs.  Beal is now a Paul Harris Fellow Plus-Five giver (signifying an initial $1,000 donation with five additional gifts at the same amount).  In 2016 Beal was named the club’s Rotarian of the Year for her guidance of local community service, literacy and volunteer projects.

Neda Beal plus-5 A

Jun 052019
 

University of South Carolina professor Dr. David Shields brought a tasty message as Capital Rotary’s June 5 guest speaker.  Shields (flanked in photo by Rotarians Chris Myers at left and Ann Elliott) tries to revive the best-tasting produce and grains from Southern history and bring them back to the dinner table.  He said these essential ingredients of delicious and distinctive foods have become nearly extinct, giving way to crops that are more economical to grow, ship and prepare but not as mouth-watering.  A revival of Lowcountry farming and interest from chefs has created a demand for heirloom grains and vegetables.  Shields has published more than 80 articles and a dozen books based on research into the antebellum South’s crops, meals and the cooks who prepared them.  He also chairs the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation board and the Slow Food: Ark of Taste for the South project, called “a living catalog of delicious and distinctive foods facing extinction.”  A native of Maryland, Dr. Shields received his undergraduate degree from William and Mary and his PhD from the University of Chicago.  He was appointed a Carolina Distinguished Professor in 2014.

Guest-speaker-David-Shields

May 152019
 

Patricia F. Dempster (at center in photo) was welcomed into Capital Rotary’s ranks on May 15 by sponsor Ione Cockrell and club president Philip Flynn.  A Columbia native, Dempster is an insurance and financial services advisor who grew up in St. Andrews’ Whitehall area, graduated from Irmo High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Limestone College in Gaffney.  For 12 years she held various positions in Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina and its subsidiaries, working in claims processing, records management and systems support/programing.  Since 2011 she’s been a financial planner for individuals, professionals and small business owners.  Dempster is a designated Life Underwriter Training Council Fellow and a member of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors of the Midlands.  She is a sponsor for Cancer of Many Colors, a Lexington-based non-profit that helps local cancer survivors with daily living expenses and emergency needs. ​

New Member Pat Dempster

May 012019
 

Capital Rotary member Mike Montgomery (left in photo) is congratulated by club president Philip Flynn for continuing contributions to The Rotary Foundation in support of international programs that promote peace, human development and world understanding.  Montgomery now has earned Paul Harris Fellow plus-eight honors (signifying an initial $1,000 donation with eight additional gifts in the same amount).  Montgomery was an 11-year Spring Valley Rotarian before joining the Capital club in 2015.  The University of South Carolina graduate has been a private practice lawyer since 1985 and formerly served on Richland District Two’s school board and on Richland County Council.

Mike Montgomery plus 8

Apr 032019
 

Columbia’s Capital Rotary has been named “Club of the Year” in District 7770, which is comprised of 80 clubs and about 5,000 Rotarians in 25 eastern counties of the state.  Proudly displaying the new “Club of the Year” banner on Aug. 3 are (from left to right in photo) sergeant-at-arms Jack Williamson, president Philip Flynn, Assistant District Gov. Eric Davis and Blake DuBose, immediate past president.  Chartered over 30 years ago, Capital Rotary presently has about 60 members and holds weekly breakfast meetings at the Palmetto Club downtown.  Club service activities include (1) awarding continuing four-year college scholarships to local high school graduates; (2) donating paperback dictionaries to third-graders in Richland County District One elementary schools; (3) taking part in the Meals on Wheels program to deliver hot dinners to home-bound clients in Richland County; (4) volunteering at Harvest Hope Food Bank’s Columbia site; (5) sponsoring a Red Cross blood drive each summer; and (6) providing holiday gifts for a local family as part of the Midlands Families Helping Families Christmas program.  Club members also financially support district and Rotary International projects that promote peace, human development and world understanding.

Club of Year Banner

Mar 072019
 

Providing clean water, sanitation and education is the “first phase of hope” for a better life in impoverished communities in Ghana and South Sudan, according to Walter Hughes, a member of the Rotary Club of Rocky Mount, VA.  Hughes (at left in photo with local Rotarian Bud Foy), was guest speaker for Capital Rotary’s March 6 meeting.  Over the past 10 years, Hughes and teams of Rotary and non-Rotary volunteers have undertaken building projects spearheaded by Rotary International.  They’ve sunk wells to provide clean water for over 300,000 people in Africa – helping to eradicate Guinea Worm disease – and installed microflush toilets in place of pit latrines that smell bad and pollute water and soil.  In partnership with 170 Rotary clubs in the US, Canada and overseas – plus governments and other non-profit funders – Hughes’ efforts have raised more than $3.2 million for humanitarian projects.  He’s been active in Rotary-funded school building including three elementary schools, a preschool and a junior high.  One of the elementary schools now under construction is funded in part by Rotary District 7770 and four clubs in South Carolina, including Capital Rotary as lead club.

Guest speaker Walter Hughes

Feb 072019
 

At a mid-year assembly Feb. 6 to review Capital Rotary’s accomplishments to date in the 2018-2019 Rotary year, president Philip Flynn shared highlights that included:

  • Making $1,500 in charitable contributions to Rotary districts hit by natural disasters, including those affected by Hurricane Florence locally, by Hurricane Michael in Georgia/Florida and by the California wildfires.
  • Donating 741 dictionaries to third-graders in 16 Richland District One elementary schools.
  • Creation of a new Codified Policy for the club that’s a “standard operating procedure” resource for future leaders and committees.
  • Collecting 58 units of blood at the annual Red Cross Blood Drive, each donation helping to save the lives of up to three people.
  • Assisting five local college students with scholarships – current enrollees at the College of Charleston, Claflin University, the University of South Carolina, North Carolina State and Anderson University.
  • Adopting a local family and providing gifts for the holiday season as part of the 2018 Midlands Families Helping Families Christmas program.
  • Continuing community service projects with weekly Meals on Wheels delivery and annual volunteering at Harvest Hope Food Bank.
  • Supporting The Rotary Foundation with $242 per capita member giving that ranks among the top 10 clubs in District 7770.
  • Serving as lead club for a Global Grant Project, partnering with the Rotary Club of Sunyani East in Ghana, Africa to construct the Nkrankrom Elementary School.  Our club donated $2,500, District 7770 raised more, and with a Rotary Foundation match, Sunyani East was awarded about $94,000 to build the school.
  • Publicizing our activities with 39 club website and social media posts; reaching over 2,700 people through social media; 1,643 website users; 38 postings on District 7770’s website and newsletters; 53 press releases posted by local media; and six monthly club activity recaps e-mailed to members.

Club Banner resized

Jan 092019
 

Capital Rotary member Mike Montgomery (left in photo) is congratulated by club president Philip Flynn for continuing contributions to The Rotary Foundation in support of international programs that promote peace, human development and world understanding.  Montgomery has earned Paul Harris Fellow plus-seven honors (signifying an initial $1,000 donation with seven additional gifts in the same amount).  Montgomery was an 11-year Spring Valley Rotarian before joining the Capital club in 2015.  The University of South Carolina graduate has been a private practice lawyer since 1985 and formerly served on Richland District Two’s school board and on Richland County Council.

Mike Montgomery Plus 7

Nov 142018
 

Capital Rotary members got a “bulls and bears” look at the economy and stock/bond market when Nicole Dill (in photo with Rotarian Stephen West) was the club’s guest speaker Nov. 14.  Dill, a Chapin resident, works with JP Morgan Asset Management and has 20 years of experience in financial services.  In her briefing she said (1) the US economy has not had problem inflation for 30 years, a trend that will continue; (2) another recession is expected in the future, likely 2021or 2022; (3) 1,300 “baby boomers” will be retiring each day for the next decade, helping to fuel labor force needs that could keep the nation at or near full employment; (4) the Federal Reserve Board is predicted to raise interest rates in December 2018 and March 2019, and perhaps in June 2019, but probably not in September 2019; (5) the US has a consumer-driver economy, with 70% of our growth due to consumption: people buying things; (6) recent mid-term elections helped restore a more balanced government divide between Democrats and Republicans, which has been the nation’s norm 61% of the time; and (7) investors need to rebalance their accounts yearly because of national and international economic change.

Guest speaker Nicole Dill

Oct 032018
 

Columbia Housing Authority’s goal has not changed since its 1934 founding – it works to provide affordable homes for city and Richland County residents.  That mission was explained by executive director Gilbert Walker, guest speaker for Capital Rotary’s Oct. 3 meeting.  Walker (at right in photo with Rotarian Chris Ray) said 7,000 families – about 28,000 people – make up the authority’s current tenants list.  Housing costs range from $50 to about $1,500 monthly, depending on financial ability.  Walker said authority income includes federal funding, tenant rents and returns from investments.  Columbia Housing Authority is the nation’s third-oldest organization of its type, the biggest in South Carolina and the largest local provider of seniors housing.  Redevelopment of the 1940s-era Gonzales Gardens site – vacant since Gardens demolition last year – is expected to begin this November.  Walker said the project will create an impressive “gateway for the city and Richland County.”  Redevelopment proposals include single family houses, midrises for seniors, garage townhomes, mixed-income rentals and a community center/museum.  Despite its success and ambitious plans, Walker said the authority sees unmet needs – a waiting list of 15,000 people seeking homes.

Gilbert Walker

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